18 Times Celebs And Designers Called Out The Fashion Industry For Lack Of Inclusivity

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The fashion business has a problem with diversity! Many people in the industry are working on it, yet the real issue is frequently overlooked. Several firms, stylists, and celebrities have used social media to argue that the fashion industry has toxic, racist working conditions and commercial practices, which the public has seen.

It’s undeniable that the business has come a long way, but it’s still beset by challenges relating to the inclusion of people of various colors, body kinds, and races. High-profile models (such as Tess Holiday) and industry insiders are pushing for much-needed change. Here are 20 celebrities (including Dascha Polanco), designers, and stylists that have taken the issue seriously and are carrying the message to new heights.

Ashley Graham had Alexandra Shulman, the editor-in-chief of British Vogue, on her side as she chastised the fashion industry for “flatly refusing” to dress her up.

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“It strikes me as odd that, while the rest of the world is yearning for fashion to embrace broader conceptions of physical beauty, some of our most well-known fashion firms appear to be moving in the other — and, in my opinion, unwise — direction,” she subsequently wrote.

Dascha Polanco spends money on designer outfits for the red carpet despite being turned down several times. She’s sworn she’ll never wear those clothing again if they’re offered now.

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“I absolutely think the fashion business, and people in general, look at me more now that I’ve lost weight,” Khloé Kardashian told Harper’s Bazaar.

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Tess Holliday fired a staff member in 2018 after she said that “the designers aren’t manufacturing clothing” for her size and that finding a dress would be impossible.

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Tess firmly told Cosmopolitan after disclosing what happened, “Since I dismissed them, I’ve done two high fashion shoots.” I’ve shot two significant covers. In the high fashion sector, I’m going to keep doing more cooler things and basically proving them wrong in four months.”

Gabi Fresh commented on her blog on the difficulty of obtaining clothes on her own, saying that “being overweight and well-dressed is a f**king hardship.”

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Blake Lively, who has had many stunning red carpet outfits, admitted that after giving baby, “no one had samples that suited [her] after giving birth,” and she had to scurry to find something to wear for her red carpet.

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She said, “I felt insecure.” “It was only because I couldn’t fit into my clothes.”

Marquita Pring believes that the fashion industry is currently “less inclusive” than it was when she initially entered the industry.

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“We need to keep having the debate and continue inspiring casting directors to cast curvier women in their shows,” Marquita told Bustle. And we need designers to start supplying samples for it right away.”

“I don’t know if fashion has made a wholehearted effort,” she told Vogue of the vast range of sizes available. I don’t see faces like mine in the advertising; instead, I see slim white women.”

Many people praised Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty inclusion. “That consumer has been ignored before, and I’m not going to allow that happen here,” she said.

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Skin tone diversity is still a source of frustration for Philomena Kwao.

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“There aren’t many models in the US who have my depth, like really dark complexion and are also plus-size,” she told Elle.

In 2013, Marilyn Model Agency head Chris Gay called industry standards “stupid.” “They’re not standards I think a woman can [keep] throughout the course of her life or career,” he said during National Eating Disorders Awareness Week.

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Designers, according to Danielle Brooks, should not be praised for “something they should’ve done 30 years ago.”

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“Congratulations aren’t in order; a change is,” Christian Siriano added. This comes after he was hailed for accepting the offer to clothe Leslie Jones, who had been turned down by designers.

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“Working with talented individuals shouldn’t be extraordinary just because they do not sample size,” he wrote.
Congratulations aren’t necessary; a change is.”

Leslie Jones’ fight was supported by Barbie Ferreira, who tweeted: “Curvy women are not allowed to be edgy, stylish, or explore their appearance like everyone else in this profession.”

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Ferreira vented her frustrations on social media, saying, “So don’t expect much from my designer designs in the future till people wake tf up.” And then hearing about an actress in a major picture going through similar difficulties… I’m feeling hopeless, girl. Will I have to wear Sears if I win the Oscar?

“If you’re not making clothes for me, and if you don’t want to manufacture clothes for me, I don’t want to wear your [designs], I don’t want to wear your [designs],“ Lizzo told Allure.

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Jameela Jamil is another UK size 10-12 celebrity who “can’t fit into most of the clothes on any shoot,” according to reports.

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“Instead, we’re driven into a thinness uniform, and everyone who watches our media believes that if every celebrity is one size, then that must be the ‘normal’ size, and there’s something wrong with you if you don’t suit that aesthetic,” she told Stylist.

“Wrong. There’s nothing wrong with you; there’s something wrong with this company and how it treats women and their bodies.”

Law Roach, Zendaya’s stylist, revealed that labels were refusing to outfit black girls, prompting him to seek for new designers.

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He told the Hollywood Reporter’s Stylist Roundtable, “I wanted to establish… that she doesn’t have to be in Valentino to become a fashion girl.” It was also a retaliation for when they were having trouble finding clothes for her. “Now that everyone wants to dress her, I tell them, ‘Not this season!’”

In 2018, Robyn Lawley spearheaded a boycott against Victoria’s Secret to force the company to acknowledge “women of ALL ages, shapes, sizes, and ethnicities’ purchasing power and influence.”

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With her Instagram post, she started a petition encouraging people to upload unedited photos of herself with the hashtag #weareallangels. Victoria’s Secret halted their yearly show the following year.

Kate Upton has demanded that the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show cease being a “snoozefest” and start representing all women in 2019.

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“We’re tired of seeing the same body type over and over again. Kate remarked on an episode of Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen, “You have to be body inclusive now.”